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Table 1 Sample characteristics and prevalence of injuries by data source (weighted)

From: Is there value in using physician billing claims along with other administrative health care data to document the burden of adolescent injury? An exploratory investigation with comparison to self-reports in Ontario, Canada

  Total (Unwtd N = 2047) Males (Unwtd N = 1081) Females (Unwtd N = 966)
  % 95% CI % 95% CI % 95% CI
Rural 17.2 (15.7, 18.7) 17.2 (15.1, 19.2) 17.2 (14.9, 19.6)
Age group       
   12–14 years 34.0 (31.5, 36.6) 35.0 (31.6, 38.4) 33.0 (29.2, 36.8)
   15–17 years 39.4 (36.7, 42.0) 38.9 (35.3, 42.5) 39.9 (36.0, 43.8)
   18–19 years 26.6 (24.1, 29.1) 26.1 (22.8, 29.3) 27.2 (23.3, 31.1)
Injury measures
   Self-reported1 18.8 (16.9, 20.7) 22.1 (19.1, 25.0) 15.3 (12.7, 17.8)
   Administratively-def2 25.0 (22.9, 27.1) 28.0 (24.9, 31.0) 21.7 (18.6, 24.7)
Physician's office3 17.1 (15.2, 18.9) 19.5 (16.8, 22.1) 14.4 (11.9, 17.0)
ED/inpatient4 13.4 (11.8, 15.0) 15.5 (13.1, 18.0) 11.0 (8.9, 13.1)
1–2 injury visits5 16.5 (14.8, 18.3) 18.2 (15.7, 20.8) 14.6 (12.2, 17.0)
> = 3 injury visits5 8.2 (6.7, 9.6) 9.7 (7.6, 11.9) 6.4 (4.5, 8.3)
  1. CI = Confidence Interval; def=defined; ED = emergency department; unwtd = unweighted
  2. 1 Self-reported injury, identified using survey data
  3. 2 Administratively-defined injury, identified in the hospitalization or physician billing databases
  4. 3 At least 1 documented physician's office visit for injury within 1 year prior to the interview
  5. 4 Any documented emergency department or inpatient visits for injury within 1 year prior to interview
  6. 5 Number of physician visits (any location) for injury (based on physician billing data only)