You are viewing the site in preview mode

Skip to main content

Advertisement

Table 5 Most frequent drug-drug exposures with a strong inhibitor in all patients (n = 1221). Classification of the potential drug-drug exposure was determined by the content of the prescribing information associated with the brand-name drug

From: Frequency and clinical relevance of potential cytochrome P450 drug interactions in a psychiatric patient population – an analysis based on German insurance claims data

Potential drug-drug exposure (bold = strong inhibitor) Frequency Events per 100 person-years (95%CI) Number of patients with at least one DDE (%) Clinical relevance of a potential interaction (as per prescribing information)
amitriptyline & paroxetine 29 0.56 (0.37–0.80) 9 (0.74) Patients taking SSRIs should only be treated with amitriptyline with particular caution [35] [reason not given]
paroxetine & risperidone 21 0.40 (0.25–0.62) 6 (0.49) Paroxetine increases the plasma-concentration of risperidone [36]
codeine & fluoxetine 8 0.15 (0.07–0.30) 5 (0.41) not mentioned [37, 38]
amitriptyline & fluoxetine 16 0.31 (0.18–0.50) 5 (0.41) Taking fluoxetine and amitriptyline in parallel might result in an increased plasma-concentration of amitriptyline Dose-reduction might be necessary [33]
fluoxetine & tramadol 42 0.81 (0.58–1.09) 5 (0.41) Taking tramadol and fluoxetine in parallel can induce serotonin syndrome [32]
amlodipine & clarithromycin 5 0.10 (0.03–0.22) 4 (0.33) Taking clarithromycin and amlodipine parallel might result in an increased plasma concentration of amlodipine [39]
clomipramine & paroxetine 76 1.46 (1.15–1.82) 4 (0.33) Paroxetine can increase the plasma concentration of clomipramine [40]
paroxetine & tramadol 6 0.12 (0.04–0.25) 4 (0.33) Taking tramadol and SSRIs [i.e., paroxetine] in parallel can induce serotonin syndrome [32]. Patients taking tramadol and paroxetine must be monitored closely [35]
    
Sum 380 7.29 (6.57–8.06) 90