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Table 1 Electronic survey answers on content, transfer and use of the discharge summary from 107 primary care units

From: Elderly at risk in care transitions When discharge summaries are poorly transferred and used –a descriptive study

  Never Seldom Often Always
The discharge summary is received on the day the patient is discharged. 32 (29%) 53 (50%) 22 (21%) 0
The discharge summary is received, but not on the day the patient is discharged. 3 (3%) 33 (31%) 66 (61.5%) 5 (4.5%)
The discharge summary is not received, but the medical report is instead incorporated into the medical case history. 10 (9%) 49 (46%) 40 (37%) 8 (8%)
The information in the medical report is clearly written. 0 24 (23%) 71 (66%) 12 (11%)
The information in the medical report is reliable 0 18 (17%) 78 (73%) 11 (10%)
The reason for any drug change is indicated in the medication report. 1 (1%) 44 (41%) 52 (49%) 10 (9%)
The information in the medication list is reliable 0 22 (21%) 74 (69%) 11(10%)
Drug indication is indicated in the medication list. 1 (1%) 32 (30%) 63 (59%) 11 (10%)
The doctor in charge checks the medication list and the medical report to urgently detect any uncertainties/errors. 0 13 (12%) 63 (59%) 31 (29%)
If any uncertainty/error is detected, it is followed up by the doctor in charge. 0 14 (13%) 47 (44%) 46 (43%)
The medication list is updated and changes documented as patient chart entries when the discharge summary is received. 11 (10%) 35 (33%) 44 (41%) 17 (16%)
The medication list is not updated nor changes documented as patient chart entries until the patients next planned contact. 0 34 (32%) 53 (49%) 20 (19%)
After drug changes during hospitalisation, treatment is followed up by the doctor in charge if needed. 1 (1%) 28 (26%) 49 (46%) 29 (27%)
The discharge summary is of great help for follow-up of the patient’s medication treatment after the hospital stay. 1 (1%) 13 (12%) 39 (36%) 54 (51%)