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  • Correction
  • Open Access

Correction to: Conceptual model of managing health care volunteers in disasters: a mixed method study

  • 1,
  • 2,
  • 3, 4 and
  • 5Email author
BMC Health Services Research201919:330

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4165-3

  • Published:

The original article was published in BMC Health Services Research 2019 19:241

Correction to: BMC Health Serv Res

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4073-6

In the original publication of this article [1], the percent sign at the first row of the Table 2 needs to be deleted. The updated Table 2 is shown below:
Table 2

The importance of items related to managing healthcare volunteers in disasters

Items

Importance (First round) N = 42

Consensus rate (Second round) N = 38

Laws and regulations

Passing the related law

81

100

Comprehensive safety standards and regulations

89

100

Insurance coverage for volunteers

89

97.5

Developing code of ethics

80

87.5

NGOs

Facilitate creation of NGOs

81.4

100

Reforming the structure of NGOs

78.6

77.5

Strengthening the NGOs–government relationship

84.2

97.5

Socio-cultural settings

Enhancing loyalty of volunteers

83.8

100

Working on community’s viewpoint on volunteers

85.8

100

Working on manager’s viewpoint on volunteers

89.6

97.5

Preparedness

Promote volunteering

84.2

100

Set recruiting guideline

92.8

85

Organizing DMATs

87.6

95

Empowering the volunteers

93.8

100

Response

Conducting rapid assessment

90.4

100

Recall and dispatch

92

100

Division of labor

93.8

100

Defining job description

92

97.5

Coordination between volunteers and formal responders and commander

89

98

Anticipating communication methods

95.2

98

Commanding

90

96

Controlling volunteers

84

97.5

Evaluating volunteers

80

94

Providing daily feedback to volunteers

75

70

Providing feedback to volunteers at the end of mission

80

100

Retention

Motivating volunteers

82.4

100

Providing safety and security

93

100

Termination

Anticipating leaving and dismissal guideline

85.8

100

Anticipating discharging guideline

80

90

Follow -up

Physical health status

88

100

Mental health status

89

100

Notes

Declarations

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
Department of Disasters and Emergency Health, Research Center of Accidents Prevention and Dealing with Disasters, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
(2)
Department of Health in Emergencies and Disasters, School of Health Management and Information Sciences, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
(3)
Department of Disaster Public Health, School of Public Health, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
(4)
Harvard Humanitarian Initiative, Harvard University, Cambridge, USA
(5)
Reproductive Health, Research Center for Nursing and Midwifery Care, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran

Reference

  1. Salmani I, et al. Conceptual model of managing health care volunteers in disasters: a mixed method study. BMC Health Serv Res. 2019;19:241. https://doi.org/10.1186/s12913-019-4073-6.View ArticlePubMedPubMed CentralGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© The Author(s). 2019

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